‘Teaching Strategies’ Archive

Reflection

The Reflective Educator/Facilitator Part Two: Meaningful Self-Reflection and Record-Keeping to Improve Your Practice

My most recent post from the Inspired Educator Blog Archives “Embracing the Quiet and Taking Time to Reflect” focused on the importance of prioritizing time for self-reflection to improve your work as a teacher, trainer, counselor or group facilitator. Taking the time to reflect on our professional practice helps us find meaning and develop insight […]

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Active Engagement

Activities to Get Them Moving, Talking, Reflecting, and Keep Them Engaged

Recent research from cognitive neuroscientists validates the idea that educators will increase participant attention, motivation, and learning outcomes when they intentionally weave in opportunities to get them away from their desks or boardroom tables and move, interact, discuss and reflect with their peers…

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Joy_in_Learning

The Educator as Guide

When I work with educators from all backgrounds I often find myself encouraging them to reflect on the idea of a “student centered ” or “participant centered” view of teaching and group facilitation. In this approach an educator/counselor/facilitator thinks of themselves as a “guide” in the process of learning, discovery and group development rather than as an all-knowing teacher and center of knowledge and direction…

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Reflection

The Reflective Educator: Meaningful Self-Reflection and Record Keeping to Improve Your Practice

In this blog post Jennifer Stanchfield explores the importance of prioritizing time for self reflection to improve your practice as an teacher, trainer, counselor or group facilitator. Taking the time to reflect on our professional practice helps us find meaning in our work, develops insight into what strategies or approaches are most effective and help us use what we learn each day from our clients or students to improve our work in the future.

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Jen Stanchfield's Kitchen and Key Ingredients for Successful Teaching, Group Facilitation

The Right Ingredients at the Right Time: Sequencing Group Learning Experiences

As with cooking, facilitation is an art that involves a combination of practice, observation, knowledge of theory and creativity. Effective facilitators act as a good chef does, adding together the important elements in the right amounts at the right time to create a palatable and hopefully meaningful experience. Through careful observation of all of these elements involved in a group’s personality and setting, they intentionally choose and order activities or “ingredients” in order to maximize learning opportunities.

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Bookending a Learning Experience with Strong Beginnings and Endings, Another Fun Idea: Upcycled Computer Key Board Keys

My last two posts have focused on methods for positively influencing learning outcomes with groups through strong beginnings. I shared some of my favorite activities for starting off with style and creating a “hook” to engage participants from the moment they walk through the door including the use of postcards, objects and quotes.   These […]

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Start Off With Style. Find a Hook!

“The beginning is the most important part of the work”. -Plato   Starting Off with Style: The events or activities experienced the first time learners are exposed to information greatly impact their ability to retain the information. John Medina (2008), author of Brain Rules states: “If you are trying to get information across to someone […]

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Another Idea to Get Them Moving and Keep Them Engaged: “Anyone Who”

This is a follow up on a popular post from last fall that offered ways to actively engage learners in the classroom, boardroom, training or group counseling setting.   Research on the brain and learning emphasizes the importance of breaking up lecture and direct instruction with activities that involve learners socially, emotionally and physically as […]

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Can a Lecture Be Experiential?

Can a Lecture Be Experientiall? While in graduate school, I had an interesting conversation with Dr. Jasper Hunt my professor at Minnesota State University, Mankato. We were filling out conference proposal forms for an experiential education conference. He commented about the “check box” on the application form requesting us to identify which portion of the […]

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The Educator as Guide

“A teacher is one who makes himself progressively unnecessary” – Thomas Curruthers Last week I was inspired by some recent discussions with educators and counselors about educational philosophy and dug into the blog archives with a post on “What is Experiential Education”. Today I am adding to this discussion by revisiting the idea of the […]

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Get Them Moving, Keep Them Engaged

If you are reading this post, chances are you believe it is important to find ways to actively engage learners in your classroom, boardroom, or group counseling setting.  However, when we have a lot of material to cover in our lesson plans or agendas some of us might find ourselves forgetting just how important regular […]

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Engaging Groups in Meaningful Dialogue and Reflection While Practicing Decision-making and Consensus Building.

Engaging Groups in Meaningful Dialogue and Reflection While Practicing Decision-making and Consensus Building. Jen Stanchfield   My last few posts have explored the power of play to help learners build decision-making, and conflict resolution skills. I have emphasized that educators can intentionally “weave in” opportunities for groups to practice these skills throughout their day- to-day […]

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Experiential Education Books and Resources

Friday Lessons at Wood ‘N’ Barnes: Increasing Involvement, Trust, and Buy In

As part of a new Wood ‘N’ Barnes author series every Friday in October I’m offering a new free downloadable lesson regarding experiential-based group facilitation and processing. This week’s lesson focuses on increasing involvement and facilitating “buy in” and trust with group participants Click here to check it out.

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